Features

Paranoia as Resistance in Gloria Naylor’s 1996

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Fake news, mass surveillance, and global pandemic aren’t mere tropes to explore the life of the mind. They are our everyday lives.

The First Book of Mary Norbert Korte: A Research

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Her first book, Hymn to the Gentle Sun of 1967, was, in many ways, the catalyst for Korte’s transition from nun to radical poet.

The Brief Life of Brutalism

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Only now, fifty years after the formal end of the Brutalist movement, does it appear in the timeline of world architecture not so much as a steppingstone but as a stumbling block.

The End of the Road: The Last Great Road Bum by Héctor Tobar

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If Walter Benjamin’s angel of history moved backwards, observing society’s wreckage but blind to its progress, the many avatars of Joe’s wandering generation saw the whole world blurry, victims of their own velocity.

Starlets of Dystopian Sport

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Rollerball and Death Race 2000 may have been early entrants into diagnosing that dreadful feeling that accompanies the unbeatable supremacy of capitalism.

Here Comes the Small Press

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The bookmobile’s appropriation by the small press community, although on a relatively small scale, played a crucial role in forming independent publishing communities.

The Monster Out of Nowhere

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Imagining the mass strike and practically organizing it are one and the same activity.

Mary Seacole and the Cholera in Panama

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Mary Seacole’s account of her role in treating Cholera’s victims presents a portrait of one epidemic-stricken community that responds in ways both typical and, in our own pandemic times, uncomfortably familiar.

Reading the Dehumanized Perspective in Narratives of the Partition of 1947

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The insidious malleability of dehumanization sheds a great deal of light on ingroup-outgroup tensions.