Features

POW!

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Grime was doing something with, and to, the lived sociality of Tower Hamlets, Newham, and other eastern boroughs in the early 2000s.

Desiring Beyond the Impasse

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Instead of approaching these works as cautionary tales that invite us to be grateful for what we have, we could read them as a reflection of a violent landscape of desire.

Two Views on Encounter and Impasse

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Because humanity in the flesh is prohibited within it, the DMZ as a domain not only compels but also in a sense, in its current state, requires speculation.

“Aint Nobody Caught Me”

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Women of Color have used speculative and science fiction as genres of expression, overcoming the oppressive structures that incarcerate our realities

“There is Almost Not an Interval”: Composing in Steinian Time

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Stein’s process moves in a way that creates an artifice of ambiguity and forms a structure that can reconfigure infinitely. There is a disruptive function to her use of repetition, a disorienting pulse.

Nonfiction’s Liquid State

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To the reading eye, a solid block of text suggests a takeover. It demands immersion. It may not be easy to find your place once you look up from the page. It reminds us of the body’s limits.

Letters on Ashon Crawley’s The Lonely Letters

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Each letter is a flexing, embodied interweaving of queer theory, Black studies, music, eros, intellect, art, friendship, religion, body, breath

Silent, Still, Singing, Still: Two Poets in Chorus

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Look closely, and all things seem to have been touched by someone’s pain—all things optical, chemical, mechanical. Everything blossoms in destruction, everything is a deathly flower.

Keeping the Bear Afloat: Lessons from Diane di Prima’s Small Press Legacy

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Fast-paced political publishing still exists, often a display of the power and potential that lies in thinking big and publishing “small.”

On Friendship

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This delight in difference is what black religion in the post-Trump still-neoliberal age, which is another way to say black religion in the age of Thomas Jefferson, in the age of racial capitalism, antiblack racism, and settler colonialism, needs to rediscover.