Interviews

Grant Maierhofer, Part II

w/

[Digging] reflects . . . for me, rather than a resignation, an active embrace of the dirt, the mud, the worms, the fungus, the bodies. The best way out is through . . . this kind of thing.

Grant Maierhofer

w/

It made sense to me that writers or artists should utilize constraint in our present world of seemingly limitless possibility.

Sadie Dupuis

w/

I love gossip in poems, and I love to see friendship performed in pieces of art, so I don’t know how to create things like that without those kinds of references.

Nick Drnaso

w/

With comics, for better or worse, you can’t really hide from who you are. You’re spending so much time working on these things that you can’t keep up a persona for that long.

Tiff Dressen

w/

Communing with the mineral/rock world is also another way for me to contemplate time, and to understand that the destructive/creative geologic processes are always underfoot.

Kamden Ishmael Hilliard

w/

The curse and hex lie alongside the charm and balm. Rhetoric has no team, rhetoric has no flag. 

Sara Rauch

w/

On some level, memories can feel like locked rooms that you might enter at will and find a moment perfect and unchanged. But . . . those perfectly preserved rooms are shifting and changing constantly, as we are.

Anne K. Yoder

w/

This practice of pharmacy, fundamentally, writing about that in a fictional way brings it into the realm of science fiction. Or it can, very easily. Yet I feel far more connected to literary fiction.

Lindsey Boldt

w/

My sincere hope is that someone will read this and invite me to do some sublimely goofy shit with them.

Harald Voetmann

w/

What happens to the man that demands respect from the goddess Nature? An erupting volcano is the only appropriate response.