Interviews

Lisa Olstein and Julie Carr

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We need to hold each other in our fears and support each other in directing our actions, however fruitless they may sometimes seem.

Jay Hammond

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An album based on a novel about a 2020’s apocalypse written in the 1990’s resonated with listeners in ways that I couldn’t have imagined when I started writing the songs many years ago.

Andrew Holleran

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I wanted to write about a lost Florida, my Florida, if you will. 

Mark Oppenheimer

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The human condition is one that has violence and unexpected death. We should always be asking how people move through it and come together again. How they endure.

Penny Slinger

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Our adornments are not just for vanity, but for resonance—they transmit something to someone who sees you. It’s not just to look pretty; it’s a language.

Gabriel Ojeda-Sagué and Sebastian Castillo

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I do think I’ve lost something that’s beyond recovery, which is the tender feeling for a language that comes with it being native to your world and brain.

Courtney Maum

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I spend a lot of time with each sentence asking myself: is this as true as it can be? Am I taking a risk here?

Yanara Friedland

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I keep having this phrase that feels important to me: How does language happen to me? In relationship to these landscapes, in relationship to these questions, in relationship to these documents. What kind of language wants to emerge?

Bruno Navasky

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How Do You Live? is of great value to the global generation that is coming of age in a time of so much uncertainty — political and economic changes, new technologies, covid, global warming, and so on — and wondering how to live their lives in the face of it all.

William Lessard

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If corporations are people, what are people?