Interviews

Forsyth Harmon

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“Illustrated literature hasn’t really been popular since the nineteenth century. I would like to open the discussion around that form again, to see what we can do with it.”

Isabel Yap

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“Are these instances magic? Are they myths? To us, they’re just part of life.”

Andrea Muehlebach

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You have to look beyond the monster itself in order to understand what it actually means.

Mika

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Within the violence of that work I find a space to explore myself, a hostile and empty space with which to reconfigure myself.

Radix Media

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“The printer as designer, actual mechanic, person laying down the ink, and also the writer and artist is the historical model we’re looking at.”

Kathryn Smith

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You can start looking for things that aren’t there. If a poem elicits an emotional response, you don’t need to pull it apart to figure out why.

Morgan Christie

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“I don’t know if my longing to incorporate all of the voices I’ve heard and still seek out wouldn’t be as present as it is if I didn’t come up in a place where there were so many singing, harmonizing with the city.”

Zara Houshmand

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“I believe that part of the task of translation is to help us explore that complexity rather than looking away, and to understand difference instead of erasing it.”

Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling

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On some level, Vermont remains the arugula-chomping hippie at the farmers’ market, while New Hampshire is still a guy asserting his right to mow the lawn while naked.

Erika T. Wurth

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“And here’s the thing: even if folks are from the ghetto or the reservation, their lives do not fit into these predetermined binaries.”