Interviews

Michelle Gil-Montero

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we leave space for translators to foreground their own vision, and to reveal how the poetics of their translation responds to the demands and excitements of that particular book.

Ari Brostoff

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Obviously people take breaks, people burn out—who knows how long I’ll actually last. But aspirationally, there’s no end.

Uzma Aslam Khan

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What does it mean to be the first generation born in a new country, on very old and beautiful land still reeling from colonialism and Partition? There was no map, and still isn’t, for how to contextualize my place in this tumultuous history.

Jerry Stahl

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What do you wear to the greatest crime scene of the twentieth century?

Madison Smartt Bell

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In the first world, we learn to be extremely afraid of anything that disrupts the hegemony of the ego.

Eli Valley

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There’s something about the visceral nature of art and comics that can really land in an emotional way that totally transcends the written word.

Lisa Olstein and Julie Carr

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We need to hold each other in our fears and support each other in directing our actions, however fruitless they may sometimes seem.

Jay Hammond

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An album based on a novel about a 2020’s apocalypse written in the 1990’s resonated with listeners in ways that I couldn’t have imagined when I started writing the songs many years ago.

Andrew Holleran

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I wanted to write about a lost Florida, my Florida, if you will. 

Mark Oppenheimer

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The human condition is one that has violence and unexpected death. We should always be asking how people move through it and come together again. How they endure.