Features

The Literary Life of Connie Converse

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On her own, Converse created great and complex work, but what might the canon look like today if she found an audience in her lifetime? If she created in communion with other great art?

You Barely Even Work Here: On Higher Education and the Myths of Neutrality

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Our complicity in capitalist transactions does not have to prevent us from learning together . . . We can let go of the increasingly stale idea that the classroom or campus is ever a pristinely objective or neutral space.

Exterior Lives

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Ranging in scale from tiny projects by one-man development teams to titles with million-dollar production budgets, video games seem much more eager than the literary establishment to borrow and learn from other forms.

Freedom Sounds and Care Practices in Anti-Extractivist Mapping

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Over the course of a year, Maizal collected sound recordings of the wildlife and waterflow of the Andean moorlands under threat from mining, as well as interviews with veterans of anti-mining activism from the pueblo Nangali. The result is an imaginative archive and ambitious cartographic experiment . . .

Parts of the Body in Non-Protagonist-Centered Fiction

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Separating part and whole, then, is not enough to see parts of the body differently. The individual has to be sidelined, which is exactly what non-protagonist-centered fiction achieves.

In Our Times, a Space, In Our Struggles, a Future: A Vision for the Worlds to Come

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Ours is a world on fire, flooded, starved, wounded, violent, and oppressive and at the same time heroic, inventive, resilient, adaptive, beautiful, and endlessly imaginative.

Off the Road with Ted Rees

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Vagabondage, thrill-seeking, and risk underwrite the best of these poems—and knowledge of Rees’s adventures only makes the best of his work resonate more strongly.

Ecstatic Truth in the Age of American “Truthiness”: On Werner Herzog’s The Twilight World

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The triangulation of the novel and “fake news” and Werner Herzog’s whole deal signals discomfiting connections between the United States’ current flirtations with authoritarianism and certain notions of artistic freedom.

“Yet Another Dagger Pulsing Under the Rain”: Why We Need Joyce Mansour—and Surrealism

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Just as this ardent, well-honed collection coaxes Mansour’s “molecules of revolt” into jewel-bright, posthumous flares, so may surrealism’s many ambient, alert, electrifying molecules flare up to reverse the annihilating currents of our present moment.

Giving Language to the Language of That Which Cannot Be Constructed

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By imagining new worlds and countering Zionist mythologies that deny them their history, Palestinian poets challenge the colonial history into which they have been brutally implicated by the Israeli apartheid regime.