Reviews

Gallery of Clouds – Rachel Eisendrath

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What Eisendrath needs is the regeneration of pastoral romance, to orchestrate the end that is also a beginning.

trans(re)lating house one – Poupeh Missaghi

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It is rare I encounter a work that is so formally perfectly realized of itself that it is almost painfully exciting to read; the space of the page becomes increasingly charged from the precise and repeating shapes.

The Novelist – Jordan Castro

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The present is where Castro relishes his attention, but it’s a present layered with memory and subjectivity.

Moldy Strawberries – Caio Fernando Abreu

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An existentialist dread runs throughout the narratives as they are marked by an exploration of the self, expressing the fears of a generation facing incredible challenges.

Everything is Totally Fine – Zac Smith

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If there is one thing Smith’s time capsule of Americana can teach us is to listen to our dreams and nightmares and allow them to prompt new ways of living.

Everything Like Before – Kjell Askildsen

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Askildsen’s particular gift is the subtle way he imbues these mundane moments with so much frustration and rage, which creates an atmosphere of electric disquiet.

Exteriors – Annie Ernaux

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Having combed real-life storytelling for narrative ticks, she seems to have grown out of them, seeking another, meta and autofictional register in her own writing.

You’ve Changed – Pyae Moe Thet War 

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In this sensitively observed collection, the freedom to define oneself is achieved not only through the rebellion against cultural constraints, but also the embrace of the provisional nature of identity.

Time Regime – Jhani Randhawa

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Randhawa has a control over language that I rarely encounter. There is a feeling of each word having been specifically selected, purposeful descriptions that alter the way we talk about the things around us.

Made Man – Jendi Reiter

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Made Man becomes an examination and celebration of change writ broadly along with all its magickal implications.

trans(re)lating house one – Poupeh Missaghi

by

It is rare I encounter a work that is so formally perfectly realized of itself that it is almost painfully exciting to read; the space of the page becomes increasingly charged from the precise and repeating shapes.

The Novelist – Jordan Castro

by

The present is where Castro relishes his attention, but it’s a present layered with memory and subjectivity.

Moldy Strawberries – Caio Fernando Abreu

by

An existentialist dread runs throughout the narratives as they are marked by an exploration of the self, expressing the fears of a generation facing incredible challenges.

Everything Like Before – Kjell Askildsen

by

Askildsen’s particular gift is the subtle way he imbues these mundane moments with so much frustration and rage, which creates an atmosphere of electric disquiet.