Reviews

To Write as if Already Dead – Kate Zambreno

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The forms Zambreno adopts are responses to the questions being posed.

Occupation – Julián Fuks

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If the abandoned luxury hotel is now occupied by poor, disenfranchised bodies, it could be said that Sebastián’s (and in turn, Julián’s) writing is occupied by their narratives.

This Life – Quntos KunQuest

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Isn’t a life sentence without parole like a wrong word in a sentence that is impossible to correct, condemned to exist outside of grammar and syntax?

A Forest on Many Stems: Essays on the Poet’s Novel – ed. Laynie Browne

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A collection that will be a valuable light for writers who want to explore the worlds and works of their literary ancestors, particularly those who refused to settle for a culture and a form that didn’t satisfy their needs and desires.

Takeaway: Black Death Edition – Tommy Hazard 

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“If you were to take eighty pages and divide them with comedic spleen, which is equaled only by brutality, and one grand finale of etheric transcendence to boot . . . you’d have Tommy Hazard’s story collection, TAKEAWAY.”

Meter-Wide Button – Lillian Paige Walton

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Walton joins the ranks of other contemporary writers toying with surrealism, turning it anew.

Loop – Brenda Lozano

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The cascading, scattered quality of the novel imitates the patterns of actual thought.

Under the Wave at Waimea – Paul Theroux

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If more readers both learned and otherwise knew how to take his imagination’s curious, off-kilter offerings, Paul Theroux’s name would be higher on that ranking’s leader board than it currently is.

Sevastopol – Emilio Fraia

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There is something anti-story in every story, where the force pushing towards narrative resolution is challenged by a slightly ethereal centrifugal drift which slows, and maybe even reverses, that centripetal approach.

Arborescent – Marc Herman Lynch

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Marc Herman Lynch’s ARBORESCENT luxuriates in the space between the familiar and the fantastic, dipping into both ends of the spectrum to paint a richly layered contemporary folk tale.

This Life – Quntos KunQuest

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Isn’t a life sentence without parole like a wrong word in a sentence that is impossible to correct, condemned to exist outside of grammar and syntax?

Sevastopol – Emilio Fraia

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There is something anti-story in every story, where the force pushing towards narrative resolution is challenged by a slightly ethereal centrifugal drift which slows, and maybe even reverses, that centripetal approach.

Occupation – Julián Fuks

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If the abandoned luxury hotel is now occupied by poor, disenfranchised bodies, it could be said that Sebastián’s (and in turn, Julián’s) writing is occupied by their narratives.

Loop – Brenda Lozano

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The cascading, scattered quality of the novel imitates the patterns of actual thought.