Reviews

Spilt Milk – Courtney Zoffness

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In her imaginative SPILT MILK, Courtney Zoffness strives toward empathy in a way that pushes against the cynicism we’re justified in feeling upon the trotting out of the concept.

The Works of Guillaume Dustan’s Volume 1: In My Room, I’m Going Out Tonight, Stronger Than Me – Guillaume Dustan

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Normally there is a safe distance between the reader and the work, however transgressive it is, whereas in Dustan’s writing the language is intimate, precise, explicit, pornographic even, and yet, ultimately, an attack on what is known as “Literature”.

Echo Tree – Henry Dumas

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[ECHO TREE] surely does underscore Dumas’s talent as a writer of fiction, although at the same time reminding us that he was so barbarously prevented from fully harvesting that talent.

Kӓsebier Takes Berlin – Gabriele Tergit

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In its satirical and often detached portrayal of fame, Kӓsebier Takes Berlin marks an intriguing departure from the intense psychological novels and moody literary montages of its era.

W-3 – Bette Howland

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The radicality of W-3 lies there: it is imaginative, as a form, because it is a narrative about the banal, moving contradictions of people who experience madness.

Death and So Forth – Gordon Lish

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These might be old tricks (for Lish), but they are still good tricks.

Mad, Bad & Dangerous to Know – Samira Ahmed

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As much as Mad, Bad & Dangerous to Know is a familiar novel about the teenage longing for identity, it is also guided by a profound ethic of repair, suggesting that one’s sense of self in the present is dependent upon a recovery of the past.

Rabbit Island – Elvira Navarro

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Taking little delight in the absurd, Navarro plunges into the despair, horror, and alienation of a society in steady retreat before the very irrational forces it aims to suppress.

The Regal Lemon Tree – Juan José Saer

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I think of the late Argentine author Juan José Saer as a writer of light and shadow, but The Regal Lemon Tree is a book of sound.

The Town Slowly Empties – Manash Firaq Bhattacharjee

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It is this exchange of revelation and recognition between the narrator and the reader that holds together the different leaps of scenes, visuals, and words in the book.

The Works of Guillaume Dustan’s Volume 1: In My Room, I’m Going Out Tonight, Stronger Than Me – Guillaume Dustan

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Normally there is a safe distance between the reader and the work, however transgressive it is, whereas in Dustan’s writing the language is intimate, precise, explicit, pornographic even, and yet, ultimately, an attack on what is known as “Literature”.

Teklife, Ghettoville, Eski – Dhanveer Singh Brar

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Brar’s book marks an important step in understanding the value of this music and how it allowed these black electronic musicians, DJ’s and MC’s to prosper against all the odds.

The Works of Guillaume Dustan’s Volume 1: In My Room, I’m Going Out Tonight, Stronger Than Me – Guillaume Dustan

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Normally there is a safe distance between the reader and the work, however transgressive it is, whereas in Dustan’s writing the language is intimate, precise, explicit, pornographic even, and yet, ultimately, an attack on what is known as “Literature”.

Kӓsebier Takes Berlin – Gabriele Tergit

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In its satirical and often detached portrayal of fame, Kӓsebier Takes Berlin marks an intriguing departure from the intense psychological novels and moody literary montages of its era.