Reviews

Little Bird – Claudia Ulloa Donoso

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Reading LITTLE BIRD is a bit like reading a dream journal by someone who took her dream journal very seriously: someone who never got bored or cynical, someone who remained committed to communicating with her subconscious, someone in love with what language can do to reality.

Vibratory Milieu – Carrie Hunter

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One reads in what becomes a surrender to a waking dream-state where language, isolated from its context, becomes seriously playful and casually transcendental.

The Vegas Dilemma – Vi Khi Nao

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Taken together, this is not only a good book, it’s a book of possibility, one that lays out the risks, dangers, and rewards of unconventionality.

Jack Ruby and the Origins of the Avant-Garde in Dallas – Robert Trammell

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Dallas in particular, makes weirdos, the truth of whose identities are more fruitfully explored at a bar stool than in a congressional commission.  

Shapeshifting – Michelle Ross

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Ross’s writing probes and tests assumptions that we often take for granted, and raises questions that will leave the reader musing, long after a story is finished.

Distant Fathers – Marina Jarre

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Marina Jarre offers the reader a slow unraveling of the beauty of childhood . . . a time understood through sensation and stark moments of emotional clarity.

Distant Fathers – Marina Jarre

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Some writers are made to pen memoirs.

The Luminous Novel – Mario Levrero

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Literature offers no shelter, no comfort or rescue from the total crisis, and Levrero questions any attempt to claim literature as a respite or an escape.

The Sick List – Ansgar Allen

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If THE SICK LIST is an unconventional academic novel for its form, it captures one of the academic novel’s principal tropes here: anti-intellectualism.

Moratorium – Gary Percesepe

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Just as American fiction has undergone a change because of the influence and confluence of writers and writing on the internet, there’s a similar evolution in Percesepe’s stories.

Focal Point – Jenny Qi

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FOCAL POINT, like the Greek epics it frequently references, is thus an inner odyssey through illness and loss that imparts the difficult lesson that to live is to grieve.

This Life – Quntos KunQuest

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Isn’t a life sentence without parole like a wrong word in a sentence that is impossible to correct, condemned to exist outside of grammar and syntax?

Little Bird – Claudia Ulloa Donoso

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Reading LITTLE BIRD is a bit like reading a dream journal by someone who took her dream journal very seriously: someone who never got bored or cynical, someone who remained committed to communicating with her subconscious, someone in love with what language can do to reality.

Distant Fathers – Marina Jarre

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Marina Jarre offers the reader a slow unraveling of the beauty of childhood . . . a time understood through sensation and stark moments of emotional clarity.