Reviews

Asylum Road – Olivia Sudjic

by

Asylum Road is a gripping blend of character study and psychological thriller that reads like a macabre love letter to a generation that was told the fairy tale version of globalization only to find that it ends anything but happily.

Points of Attack – Mark de Silva

by

These essays or pieces or feuilletons or Barthesian mythologies — whatever you want to call them — are the correct form for our age

Post Classic – erica kaufman

by

I ask, what does epic make possible for contemporary women writers? And I read works that point me in a direction – toward a telling that shapes differently, imagines in new ways, and meets a present time.

At the Edge of the Night – Friedo Lampe

by

The Hesperus Press edition of Friedo Lampe’s AT THE EDGE OF THE NIGHT raises the possibility that a lost German classic could well be overshadowed by its author’s extraordinary life story.

Antifa Academics

by

With the matched rise of the far-right and mass antifascism, there has been a critical need for scholarship that helps create a vital living history. A number of academics, journals, and publishers have started to take this seriously.

Barn 8 – Deb Olin Unferth

by

Because the story happens just the way it happens, chickens live on.

Some Girls Walk into the Country They Are From – Sawako Nakayasu

by

Through tongue-in-cheek revelries, “some girls” disturb the myths of origin, genre, and gender.

Warhol’s Mother’s Pantry: Art, America, and the Mom in Pop – M. I. Devine

by

The totality of Devine’s work is steeped in an American mythos to reclaim the synergy of pop songs, poetry, and photography for our own contemporary imagination.

Branwell – Douglas A. Martin

by

Martin attempts to represent Branwell’s life, his marginalised existence, with the empathy and legitimacy that was tragically unavailable to Branwell in his lifetime.

The Society of Reluctant Dreamers – José Eduardo Agualusa

by

José Eduardo Agualusa takes on the herculean task of depersonalizing dreams in order to shed light on his home country’s simmering revolution.

The Inland Sea – Madeleine Watts

by

The Inland Sea demonstrates both what realist fiction can offer, as we try harder to grapple with climate crisis, and what it can’t.

Fake Accounts – Lauren Oyler

by

I did not read Lauren Oyler’s debut, FAKE ACCOUNTS, for fun, and I won’t say that’s what it turned into, because that would be something adjacent to a lie. I read it for the discourse.

At the Edge of the Night – Friedo Lampe

by

The Hesperus Press edition of Friedo Lampe’s AT THE EDGE OF THE NIGHT raises the possibility that a lost German classic could well be overshadowed by its author’s extraordinary life story.

The Society of Reluctant Dreamers – José Eduardo Agualusa

by

José Eduardo Agualusa takes on the herculean task of depersonalizing dreams in order to shed light on his home country’s simmering revolution.