Reviews

Morel – Maxime Raymond Bock

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No paean to Montreal’s transformation into a global capital of commerce and culture . . . [Bock’s novel] imagines one of the countless souls who built contemporary Montreal, giving their bodies for the city . . .

All the Way to Summer – Fiona Kidman

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Particularly in those stories set in dismal small towns or isolated rural plots in mid-twentieth century Aotearoa (New Zealand), [Kidman’s] women long for escape: for a bigger, more liberated elsewhere.

Mettlework: A Mining Daughter on Making Home – Jessica E. Johnson

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So much within these pages concerns the relationship between self and place, and between place and environment, what we do to it and take from it.

The Sisters K – Maureen Sun

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Sun’s first novel is very much its own book, but it invites comparison to Fyodor’s 1880 family-drama-cum-spiritual-murder-mystery, The Brothers Karamazov, so boldly that I think I’ll go ahead and compare them.

Who’s Afraid of Gender? – Judith Butler

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Like a patient teacher, Butler guides readers through lazy interpretations of science, the bad arguments, and the way leftist language is . . . misused by the right. . . . Those with dog-eared copies of [their] previous . . . books will find this one an easier read.

Alien Daughters Walk into the Sun – Jackie Wang

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When Wang writes about wanting to “pollute white space with [her] Brown body,” or that “the task is to blow up language,” she means it.

The Garden of Seven Twilights – Miquel de Palol

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The tales and tellers of Palol’s novel compose a meticulous alignment of points and lines, a rigorous intellectual structure resembling the mysterious sculpture in the center of the titular Garden.

Closures: Heterosexuality and the American Sitcom – Grace Lavery

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Lavery, as a queer theorist, resists and problematizes the sitcom’s implicit assumption of the automatic goodness of marriage and family ties.

Blue Notes – Anne Cathrine Bomann

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Blue Notes is no quiet meditation on grief: it’s a well-paced and highly readable medical thriller.

If Only – Vigdis Hjorth

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Hjorth reworks that old aphorism: unhappy stories are all alike. It’s the ones that eke out a kind of happiness that set themselves apart.

Morel – Maxime Raymond Bock

by

No paean to Montreal’s transformation into a global capital of commerce and culture . . . [Bock’s novel] imagines one of the countless souls who built contemporary Montreal, giving their bodies for the city . . .

The Sisters K – Maureen Sun

by

Sun’s first novel is very much its own book, but it invites comparison to Fyodor’s 1880 family-drama-cum-spiritual-murder-mystery, The Brothers Karamazov, so boldly that I think I’ll go ahead and compare them.

Morel – Maxime Raymond Bock

by

No paean to Montreal’s transformation into a global capital of commerce and culture . . . [Bock’s novel] imagines one of the countless souls who built contemporary Montreal, giving their bodies for the city . . .

The Garden of Seven Twilights – Miquel de Palol

by

The tales and tellers of Palol’s novel compose a meticulous alignment of points and lines, a rigorous intellectual structure resembling the mysterious sculpture in the center of the titular Garden.