Reviews

Lucia – Alex Pheby

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Texts like Lucia invite us to reconsider Lucia as not simply an ruined and silenced woman, interesting only by virtue of being the daughter of James Joyce, but an artist who could have had an outlet, could have given herself and left us with more.

Sansei and Sensibility – Karen Tei Yamashita

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It doesn’t take a Janeite, however, to enjoy these stories, or to sense that Yamashita’s engagement with Austen runs somewhere between pastiche and parody.

The Wanting was a Wilderness – Alden Jones

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Exploring the terrain of truth, especially of ourselves, especially the mirror of our past actions, is not for those lacking determination.

The Artist as Economist: Art and Capitalism in the 1960s – Sophie Cras

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Even as this text overtly laments the degree to which Marxist art criticism has focused too greatly upon the political underpinnings of the artwork (ideology critique), this study ultimately finds itself succumbing to its own third way politics.

My Art is Killing Me and Other Poems – Amber Dawn

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My Art is Killing Me reflects what it’s like to intimately carry someone else’s exhale; Dawn’s work becomes like a release of the tension, a liturgy on the job.

Bright Lights, Medium-Sized City – Nathan Holic

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Nathan Holic toys with the role of writer as creator in his book BRIGHT LIGHTS, MEDIUM SIZED CITY.

Cockfight – María Fernanda Ampuero

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The majority of the stories in Cockfight end on an uneasy note that suggests the continuity of violence and the messy reality of living with its legacy.

Fauna – Christiane Vadnais

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By narrating natural destruction in a neutral tone, Fauna models one way that climate-fiction can serve environmentalism.

The Imago Stage – Karoline Georges

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Georges suggests that reality can be lived, forming a lasting image instead of the preserved, yet temporary image of the virtual.

Marrow and Bone – Walter Kempowski

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The overall mood of the novel combines these two elements, of trauma and consumption, the trauma kept at arm’s length while the consumption is real, material, and close.

Fauna – Christiane Vadnais

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By narrating natural destruction in a neutral tone, Fauna models one way that climate-fiction can serve environmentalism.

Chronology – Zahra Patterson

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CHRONOLOGY is a polyvocal text, a poetics of archive. The act of reading feels akin to debriefing with a friend. The impulse to help pull it together collectively.

Fauna – Christiane Vadnais

by

By narrating natural destruction in a neutral tone, Fauna models one way that climate-fiction can serve environmentalism.

Chronology – Zahra Patterson

by

CHRONOLOGY is a polyvocal text, a poetics of archive. The act of reading feels akin to debriefing with a friend. The impulse to help pull it together collectively.