Reviews

The Bitch – Pilar Quintana

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It expertly weaves its politics into a psychologically complex story that centers a character, and her desires, frustrations, and emotions, who is not commonly represented in either Colombian or international literature.

The Inland Sea – Madeleine Watts

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The Inland Sea demonstrates both what realist fiction can offer, as we try harder to grapple with climate crisis, and what it can’t.

Ride South Until The Sawgrass

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for nigh-on end of season came the apex of her woe

¡Presente!: The Politics of Presence – Diana Taylor

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Arguably, much of what is beguiling in Diana Taylor’s approach lies in her refusal to be defeated by the negative dimension of critique; rather, she embraces a relationship with political failure, by focusing precisely on what such failure might produce.

F Letter: New Russian Feminist Poetry – ed. Galina Rymbu, Eugene Ostashevsky, and Ainsley Morse

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Collectively, the poets in F LETTER would doubtlessly endorse Rymbu’s all too familiar battle cry: “To make revolution with the vagina. / To make freedom with oneself.”

My Devotion – Julia Kerninon

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Kerninon’s novel speaks to the anxiety of what it would mean to be disappointed — a notably millennial anxiety — and it is here that she realizes a vision for the novel.

Language in Affiliate Modes: Twenty Capsule Reviews

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Much of art consists in encouraging ourselves and others to not die, despite the world’s weight.

Slash and Burn – Claudia Hernández

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Slash and Burn blurs the defined parameters of literary narratives of war, and the idea that violence has a clear beginning and endpoint, to create a searing vision of a “post-conflict” society and the quiet struggles of its ordinary members.

More Miracle Than Bird – Alice Miller

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Alice Miller brazes together speculative and historical fiction into a remarkably sturdy bijou, using the conceits and feints of counterfactual to lend a certain permanence to the real woman time might otherwise be tempted to forget.

Valentino and Sagittarius – Natalia Ginzburg

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Her novellas are containers for the cruelest of ironies, and the results are two morality tales, pushed nearly to the limits of realism.

The Inland Sea – Madeleine Watts

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The Inland Sea demonstrates both what realist fiction can offer, as we try harder to grapple with climate crisis, and what it can’t.

Fake Accounts – Lauren Oyler

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I did not read Lauren Oyler’s debut, FAKE ACCOUNTS, for fun, and I won’t say that’s what it turned into, because that would be something adjacent to a lie. I read it for the discourse.

The Bitch – Pilar Quintana

by

It expertly weaves its politics into a psychologically complex story that centers a character, and her desires, frustrations, and emotions, who is not commonly represented in either Colombian or international literature.

F Letter: New Russian Feminist Poetry – ed. Galina Rymbu, Eugene Ostashevsky, and Ainsley Morse

by

Collectively, the poets in F LETTER would doubtlessly endorse Rymbu’s all too familiar battle cry: “To make revolution with the vagina. / To make freedom with oneself.”