Reviews

Carmelina: Figures & Virgil Kills: Stories – Ronaldo V. Wilson

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Neither doubles nor doppelgangers of one another, Wilson and Carmelina, son and mother, make us rethink the question of lineage in new and unpredictable ways.

You’ll Like It Here – Ashton Politanoff

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Doesn’t nostalgia just mean, “I miss you?”

“There is No English Word”: The English Understand Wool – Helen DeWitt

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DeWitt is an iconoclast, a rebel whose heart is with the young and the awkward, with the off-kilter ultra who feels more and knows more than anyone else at the game.

The White Mosque – Sofia Samatar

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Who hasn’t wanted to swallow whole the stories we love?

Pina – Titaua Peu

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In its complex imbrication of queerness and heteropatriarchy, indigenous critique and colonial discourse, Pina stages the bizarre and beautiful workings of desire.

Jawbone – Mónica Ojeda

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If our eyes let external horrors enter us, our jaws reverse the equation.

Fandom: The Next Generation – ed. Bridget Kies and Megan Connor

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As reboots, remakes, universe extensions, and homages populate more and more of the cultural landscape, a whole set of turf battles comes along with them.

Selena Didn’t Know Spanish Either – Marisa Tirado

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I often wonder if it is just as lonely to be the last family member to speak a mother tongue as the first to not know the family language.

Householders – Kate Cayley

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What happens to idealism across time, across a lifetime, across generations? And how do we—or should we—respond to a failed utopia?

Pee Poems – Lao Yang

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The centering of urine rejects poetry’s traditional subjects in favor of a more egalitarian common denominator.

She Is Haunted – Paige Clark

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She Is Haunted mixes elements of melodrama—the mother-daughter psychodrama above all—into a traumatic temporality in which the past is never-ending.

The Moon Over Edgar – Ian Felice

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This collection advocates for attention to dreams, the uncanny, the mundane, and the moon as if now is the time to devote ourselves to that possibility rather than, like Edgar, letting our life pass before us.

Pina – Titaua Peu

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In its complex imbrication of queerness and heteropatriarchy, indigenous critique and colonial discourse, Pina stages the bizarre and beautiful workings of desire.

Pee Poems – Lao Yang

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The centering of urine rejects poetry’s traditional subjects in favor of a more egalitarian common denominator.