Reviews

My Pinup – Hilton Als

by

For any seducer, whether it is Prince or a more proximate old flame, withholding is the grammar.

All Your Children, Scattered – Beata Umubyeyi Mairesse

by

Underneath the narrative of three broken generations simmers the horrific damage of colonialism, both by the French and Belgian people, by racism, and lastly, and perhaps most confusingly, by fatherlessness.

The Logos – Mark de Silva

by

The artist and narrator of The Logos has a gift for capturing the acute essence of his subjects.

Solenoid – Mircea Cărtărescu

by

In effect, Solenoid imagines a world in which Gregor Samsa wakes up to find that he is still a human being after all, and this is somehow worse.

or, on being the other woman – Simone White

by

White looks for a way out of herself, beyond the confines of her body, and the systems of oppression meant to control her.

In the Black Fantastic – ed. Ekow Eshun

by

Even surging past the final frontier, the Black fantastic remains aware of the constraints it aims to explode.

Normal, Regular, and Rich: Charlie Markbreiter’s Gossip Girl Fan Novella

by

What becomes clear over the course of Gossip Girl Fan Novella is that no one has a very good grasp on what constitutes “normalcy” or “real life.”

Other People’s Beds – Anna Punsoda

by

Reading difficult work [is] an act of reconnaissance: scoping out different containers into which we can imagine pouring our otherwise formless and messy thoughts, memories, and observations.

Alindarka’s Children – Alhierd Bacharevič

by

To be a child of Alindarka is to be a child of linguistic confusion, to be perpetually misunderstood.

Carmelina: Figures & Virgil Kills: Stories – Ronaldo V. Wilson

by

Neither doubles nor doppelgangers of one another, Wilson and Carmelina, son and mother, make us rethink the question of lineage in new and unpredictable ways.