Reviews

Scorpionfish – Natalie Bakopoulos

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SCORPIONFISH invites us to hold Bakopoulos’s stare as she peels the layers off Greek society through her characters, but never because of them.

A History of My Brief Body – Billy-Ray Belcourt

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From a native queer experience, Belcourt extends what it means to live in a state, to surpass the body’s defined frame, and to practice emoting as transcendence.

Catherine the Great and the Small – Olja Knežević

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Knežević’s relentless chronicling of the ravages of heterosexuality and women’s centering of men invites us to read the novel as a quiet act of queer subversion in a hostile Eastern European climate.

Holeplay – Dan Schapiro

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“Rather like the eponymous sex act, Holeplay is arch, surprising, and spirited.”

Reverse Cowgirl – McKenzie Wark

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For Wark, the realization of being trans begins with a need to not exist, which, in fact, masks a need to exist but otherwise.

The Superrationals – Stephanie LaCava

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It is a novel about everything leading up to the shake-up, to the precise moment of becoming changed, of becoming unmoored.

The Lion and the Nightingale: A Journey Through Modern Turkey – Kaya Genç

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Kaya Genç expresses his experiences through a literary art of political storytelling. The primary critical outcome of THE LION AND THE NIGHTINGALE is the essential need for freedom.

Marshlands – Andre Gide

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Andre Gide invites the reader’s doubt into the ability of the novelist (both himself and his narrator) to control the meaning of his novel.

Mutations – Gary J. Shipley and Devin Horan

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For Shipley, it’s not a matter of opening our eyes, but of realizing that our body is made of many holes.

Minders – Matthew Stadler

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In the circumscribed orbit of the main characters, everyone is innately good, no one does anyone harm (violence is the preserve of faceless technology such as drones), and action is largely subordinate to a harmony of attractions.