Reviews

The Society of Reluctant Dreamers – José Eduardo Agualusa

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José Eduardo Agualusa takes on the herculean task of depersonalizing dreams in order to shed light on his home country’s simmering revolution.

Count Luna – Alexander Lernet-Holenia

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The novel takes the study of the conscience that forms the basis of Eichmann in Jerusalem and mixes it with the blinding guilt of “A Tell-Tale Heart.”

A Specter Haunting Europe: The Myth of Judeo Bolshevism – Paul Hanebrick

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The idea that communism is a Jewish plot for control, or a thoroughly Judaized ideology, is such a deep part of 20th and 21st Century antisemitism that it feels almost redundant to discuss it.

The Cheerful Scapegoat: Fables – Wayne Koestenbaum

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Koestenbaum’s THE CHEERFUL SCAPEGOAT overturns the classical idea of the fable as containing a moral; his prose is amoral, and delights in playing with the language, destabilizing meaning, or common sense.

Three Ugly Duckling Presse Chapbooks

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Alejandro Albarrán Polanco and Agustín Guambo display a radical political sensibility refracted through shards of shattered subjectivities, while Enriqueta Lunez’s fierce feminist lyricism offers an unsentimental portrayal of generational conflict among indigenous women.

Ctasy, -of shapes off shore – John Pætsch

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CTASY, -OF SHAPES OFF SHORE, is a confrontation, each poem subverts expectations, challenging the reader’s perceptions and understandings of form.

The Fire In His Wake – Spencer Wolff

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The gargantuan complexity of the human issues at the novel’s heart is a good reminder of the importance of storytelling that is honored and not coerced, believed and not picked apart.

The Diaries of Emilio Renzi: A Day in the Life – Ricardo Piglia

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His diaries offer a further, and perhaps more fundamental, opportunity to see Piglia exploring his obsession with impressions, and distorted impressions, a replaying of events and conversations.

The Bitch – Pilar Quintana

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It expertly weaves its politics into a psychologically complex story that centers a character, and her desires, frustrations, and emotions, who is not commonly represented in either Colombian or international literature.

The Inland Sea – Madeleine Watts

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The Inland Sea demonstrates both what realist fiction can offer, as we try harder to grapple with climate crisis, and what it can’t.