Reviews

The Woman Back from Moscow: In Pursuit of Beauty – Ha Jin

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Yomei remains an adherent of the Stanislavskian method she learns in Russia. . . . Jin’s novel is, in many ways, an attempt to apply this principle to fiction.

Barefoot Doctor – Can Xue

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The writing has nothing to hide behind. That alone can make a reader nervous. What’s even more nerve-rending is the prospect of living inside an artistic experiment when its creator has warned you there’s no trapdoor.

Still Alive – LJ Pemberton

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I keep thinking of STILL ALIVE as a queer Fight Club for the millennial generation. Like that earlier Gen-X novel, STILL ALIVE retains a critique of the empty promises of capitalism, one that centers queer women instead of macho men. In place of fist-fighting, we get fisting.

Dispatches from the Diaspora – Gary Younge

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By placing his Blackness at the center of his project as a journalist, Younge has been able to make clear-eyed examinations of racial politics around the globe

The Remains – Margo Glantz

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Nora grieves, remembers, and writes, and the streams of her inward life flow through a text that vibrates with texture.

Touching the Art – Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore

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Today, few know the name Gladys Goldstein. She may not have achieved the renown of the abstract expressionist giants like Jackson Pollock, but she’s the star of Touching the Art.

Voice of the Fish – Lars Horn

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Horn takes readers on an autobiographical sojourn into the mind of a transnational, transmasculine writer and savant of the aquatic.

The Art of Libromancy – Josh Cook

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Which free speech gets defended and which free speech is stifled? How much does power or status determine who makes the decisions? Does one person or one group of people get to decide which books are or are not available in a library or bookstore?

Over Sight – Inna Krasnoper

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Did the poet make her speech presentable for the world? Is it smoothed out and proper enough? Did it go to Oxford and learn to use its commas?

Our Philosopher – Gert Hofmann

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OUR PHILOSOPHER is no celebratory Bildungsroman. But why should it be, when, for Hans, growing up means integrating into a sick society?