Reviews

Veba Geceleri (Nights of Plague) – Orhan Pamuk

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Every five years or so Mr. Orhan Pamuk, our Nobel laureate, publishes a new novel and we, the devout Turkish readers, bear arms.

Late Summer – Luiz Ruffato

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In LATE SUMMER Ruffato uses the final days of an ordinary Brazilian man returned to the city of Cataguases to subtly confront the societal changes and inequalities in Brazil.

Nudes – Elle Nash

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Ultimately, Nash has created a spiny and sobering arrangement of characters outside the urban landscape prioritized in contemporary literature, which is refreshing in itself.

Bride of the Sea – Eman Quotah

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A tale of liminality and family, characters continually trying to piece themselves together among persistent loss. This is the condition of being a migrant, of being in-between, told in a stunning story which spans nearly fifty years.

Migratory Birds – Mariana Oliver

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In Oliver’s hands, the essay, like the cassette, is a container that does not dictate content but rather proves to be remarkably capacious.

A Poetics of the Press – ed. Kyle Schlesinger

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What emerges is the ideal of a nonconformist, nonhierarchical approach to publishing, spontaneous and attentive to immediate social concerns.

Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath – Heather Clark

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Clark’s biography is not only one of the most impressive examples of the form in recent history, but a long overdue exercise in placing Sylvia Plath firmly within the poetic traditions she helped shape.

Terminal Boredom – Izumi Suzuki

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TERMINAL BOREDOM’s predictive nature is historically rooted and justified, finding form in the budding apathy of late Capitalism that was emerging when they were written.

As You Were – David Tromblay

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For many readers, Tromblay’s gift may be perspective, a reminder of what a life can really entail, how powerless each of us is to stop what happens to us, and how much strength it takes to keep going.

Lift Up the Stone: The Gospel According to Jonathan – Jonathan Harrington

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Idiosyncratic and sometimes startling, these poems demonstrate both the elasticity of the sonnet form and the meditations of a fertile, original mind.