Reviews

Grandview Drive – Tim Blackett

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Earl converses, dines, and laughs with the residents of Grandview Drive and, through the power of fantasy, its sense of control and infiniteness, makes a final attempt to fulfill the longing for lasting connection that haunts him.

The Case of Cem – Vera Mutafchieva

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The Case of Cem takes place in the fifteenth century, when the world was crudely split between East and West—not unlike the Cold War world in which the novel was written.

The Capture of Krao Farini – Nay Saysourinho

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Billed as “part Turing test, part circus flyer,” Saysourinho’s debut chapbook narrates the imagined inner world of a woman known as Krao Farini, a late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century sideshow performer often called “The Missing Link” for her hypertrichosis.

Your Name, Palestine – Olivia Elias

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As a child of the Nakba, Elias has dedicated her oeuvre to the Palestinian cause and to the memory of the repeated cycles of Palestinian displacement and oppression.

Black Pastoral – Ariana Benson

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The poet envisions history as a living, breathing entity that we are both beholden to and shaped by—this is not just swaths of greenery, but land that has borne witness to, and evolved around Black suffering.

Recital of the Dark Verses – Luis Felipe Fabre

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Fabre blends serious (but not self-serious) social and religious commentary with punny nameplay humor and mutilated bodies to make a point about how fundamentalism itself arises from relatively picayune squabblings.

Her Body Among Animals – Paola Ferrante

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There’s no denying, in these stories, that having a body means being vulnerable: to viruses, to heartbreak, to violence. Yet the stories also inspire hope. . . . HER BODY AMONG ANIMALS illustrates the insoluble contradictions of modern life while gesturing toward the possibility of redemption.

The Loneliness Files – Athena Dixon

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These days, we’re confronted with a constant influx of simulations of communication, fun, intimacy, activity, travel. But we’re not present: it’s like seeing the world after your death, or a world into which you were never born.

Artless – Natasha Stagg

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Nobody wants to be duped, least of all cool denizens of downtown New York. But, as Stagg knows well, self-conscious attempts at image-management foreclose flights of passion and risk—those vehicles for great art and thinking.

House of Caravans – Shilpi Suneja

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The circular tragedy Suneja draws in this intricate debut is perhaps not a circle at all, but a spring, ready to burst as soon as we allow ourselves the freedom to love across borders . . .