by Amelia Brown

Little Bird – Claudia Ulloa Donoso

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Reading LITTLE BIRD is a bit like reading a dream journal by someone who took her dream journal very seriously: someone who never got bored or cynical, someone who remained committed to communicating with her subconscious, someone in love with what language can do to reality.

Mind Melding Across the Genre Divide

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To choose the “we” narrator is inherently political. The collectively narrated novel is fairly new—to literary realism, anyway.

Imaginary Museums – Nicolette Polek

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Polek allows her characters — and therefore herself — to face the fear of futility that lurks everywhere in her exhibits. But there is a real grace in this devastation, too. Alongside the grace, stories like these provide that fizzy tincture of strangeness and humanity that every reader I know lives for.

Space Invaders – Nona Fernández

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Fernández does something vitally important here, something rare in American narratives of collective protest: she does not equate uncertainty with foolishness.