Debut Books

The Consequences – Niña Weijers

How often can refusal be appropriated, marketed, sold and consumed by those who possibly cause it, before the only chance an earnest human has is stop making art?

Asymmetry – Lisa Halliday

One of these novellas is not like the other. The asymmetry, of course, is very much the point, and the contrast is inherently political. Together, the two parts ask, What ‘we’ can hold us?

The Book of Resting Places – Thomas Mira y Lopez

Mira y Lopez’s encyclopedic interests flirt with the ready information saturation of the current moment, but his facile movement between subjects, both cerebral and intimate, honor the careful attention of authorship over hiveminded wikis.

Infinite Ground – Martin MacInnes

This is much more than a book with multiple endings (or even multiple worlds); this is an impressive exploration of porosity.

Pretend We Are Lovely – Noley Reid

You put pounds of candy in your freezer you guess to give you a false sense of abundance?, a tip from a self-help book on unfull hearts and how to handle them.

Goddess of Democracy: an Occupy Lyric – Henry Wei Leung

Through witnessing the movement as an outsider while reflecting on his complex position, Leung creates a rich, dynamic inquiry into our responsibility to one another.

Code of the West – Sahar Mustafah

Here are two representations of the country: One insisting unimaginatively as to what it takes to obliterate the nuances of social difference with blunt force, and the other just trying to get by.

Mammother – Zachary Schomburg

At some point in your life, something will fall in front of your feet that you did not expect. There’s a challenge that MAMMOTHER offers the reader: to believe, simply, in what you are about to read, and then to risk reading it.

The Resurrection of Joan Ashby – Cherise Wolas

Through Joan’s writings we see what Joan refuses to — that she has not and cannot inoculate her writing from her life; that her art and her life are symbiotic.

Goodbye, Vitamin – Rachel Khong

The way that Ruth gauges the progression of her father’s illness is food-centric.