Debut Books

Arkady – Patrick Langley

When the ranks of climate refugees grow steadily, new ways of structuring our lives will have to be tested.

Crosslight for Youngbird – Asiya Wadud

Wadud’s poems of witness are far less remote than one might expect of an often commemorative tradition, underwritten by a deep physical sympathy.

I’m Open to Anything – William E. Jones

The book, both in its physicality and content, poses a challenge not to conservative forces who would immediately shut it down, but rather to progressive and “open-minded” people who support queer writing — but only if it’s “literary” and respectable.

Fade Into You – Nikki Darling

In every trip to get punk t-shirts on Melrose or listen to Pink Floyd at Griffith Observatory she is not merely coming of age; she is coming of culture, of heritage, of community.

The Naked Woman – Armonía Somers

THE NAKED WOMAN continues to speak to us nowadays as fiercely and urgently as seventy years ago: more than ever, women’s bodies are the place of political battles that seek to change the way we understand desire, consent, and autonomy.

Minor Monuments – Ian Maleney

Recording for Maleney is the fold in time that bends toward the unrecoverable past.

Terra Nullius – Claire G. Coleman

It should come as no surprise that Coleman, an Australian Aboriginal author of the South Coast Noongar people, is particularly poised to enliven the tropes of the science fiction contact genre.

Crimson – Niviaq Korneliussen

CRIMSON is a piece of literature that aims to make sense of queer experience by constructing a literary world adequate to house its complexities.

Malva – Hagar Peeters

The heroine of MALVA is a fictional creation, and as a typical daughter, she is only too prepared to justify her father’s behavior.

Brother in Ice – Alicia Kopf

The aims of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration are exposed by the writer as quests into nothingness.