by Michael Schapira

Jay Hammond

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An album based on a novel about a 2020’s apocalypse written in the 1990’s resonated with listeners in ways that I couldn’t have imagined when I started writing the songs many years ago.

20 4 420: Irie Edition

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In the immortal and ominous words of Prince Buster, “Enjoy yourself, it’s later than you think.”

Sophus Helle

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Gilgamesh is like a more complex version of a Rorschach test, a literary kaleidoscope that you can turn many ways and see so many patterns within. What you pick out often says a lot about you.

Jack Ruby and the Origins of the Avant-Garde in Dallas – Robert Trammell

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Dallas in particular, makes weirdos, the truth of whose identities are more fruitfully explored at a bar stool than in a congressional commission.  

Reinhold Martin

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I’ve tried to think about the university as something to be protected and looked after, and for that very reason, also as the object of our most unrelenting critique.

Yelena Moskovich

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I love stories where people go to hell, and obviously this novel is my contribution to that literature.

Andrea Muehlebach

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You have to look beyond the monster itself in order to understand what it actually means.

Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling

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On some level, Vermont remains the arugula-chomping hippie at the farmers’ market, while New Hampshire is still a guy asserting his right to mow the lawn while naked.

Wendy Kline

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What the feminist health movement really did was change the way that we understand evidence and experience – and actually the knowledge of the body. Individual experience can be as legitimate as scientific knowledge.

20 4 420: Irie Edition

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The following playlist is humbly submitted for your listening pleasure from Full Stop, your full service literary journal.