Books in Translation

Stranger to the Moon – Evelio Rosero 

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Rosero goads the reader to consider what tenses we’re thinking, dreaming, imagining in, as we hurtle at the precipice, towards a future not by any means assured.

Rogomelec – Leonor Fini

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ROGOMELEC is a collection of surrealist vignettes, conjoined by non-sequiturs. The novel is opaque, and that’s how Fini likes it. 

Elena Knows – Claudia Piñeiro

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This novel is a miraculous feat: a novel that denounces injustice, advocates for the elderly and the ill, and clearly advocates for access to abortion, without giving up style or literary verve.

Permafrost – Eva Baltasar

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PERMAFROST isn’t the conventional, happily-ever-after fairytale-esque story . . . Baltasar shows that although life may be grim and cruel, one must carry on and entrust that there is a glimmer of hope to be found somewhere.

Wild Animals Prohibited: Stories/Anti-Stories – Subimal Misra

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WILD ANIMALS PROHIBITED is a remarkable collection of strange, unwelcoming stories, with a serious desire to disrupt complacent attitudes of the literary world.

Little Bird – Claudia Ulloa Donoso

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Reading LITTLE BIRD is a bit like reading a dream journal by someone who took her dream journal very seriously: someone who never got bored or cynical, someone who remained committed to communicating with her subconscious, someone in love with what language can do to reality.

Distant Fathers – Marina Jarre

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Marina Jarre offers the reader a slow unraveling of the beauty of childhood . . . a time understood through sensation and stark moments of emotional clarity.

The Luminous Novel – Mario Levrero

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Literature offers no shelter, no comfort or rescue from the total crisis, and Levrero questions any attempt to claim literature as a respite or an escape.

A Land Like You – Tobie Nathan

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All of these different threads, some historical, some religious, some mystical, some economic — they all intertwine to create a richly layered look at a fascinating time in Cairo’s modern history.

Occupation – Julián Fuks

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If the abandoned luxury hotel is now occupied by poor, disenfranchised bodies, it could be said that Sebastián’s (and in turn, Julián’s) writing is occupied by their narratives.