Books in Translation

Nancy – Bruno Lloret

by

Lloret leans into the uncanny and absurd to illustrate the devastating and very real effects that capitalism and climate change have on everyday Chileans.

The Darkroom – Marguerite Duras

by

In distilling a great deal of the mechanisms that make Duras one of the most important writers of European modernism, THE DARKROOM is an enlivening reminder of what the struggle of literature is for.

An Apprenticeship or the Book of Pleasures – Clarice Lispector

by

Lispector’s fiction pushes us to become apprentices of language itself, to find pleasure in the cadences of subjectivity, and to seek out how our articulations of desire and pain weave our reality.

A Beast in Paradise – Cécile Coulon

by

A Beast in Paradise is far less a rural book, let alone a small-town book, than a farm book.

Veba Geceleri (Nights of Plague) – Orhan Pamuk

by

Every five years or so Mr. Orhan Pamuk, our Nobel laureate, publishes a new novel and we, the devout Turkish readers, bear arms.

Late Summer – Luiz Ruffato

by

In LATE SUMMER Ruffato uses the final days of an ordinary Brazilian man returned to the city of Cataguases to subtly confront the societal changes and inequalities in Brazil.

Migratory Birds – Mariana Oliver

by

In Oliver’s hands, the essay, like the cassette, is a container that does not dictate content but rather proves to be remarkably capacious.

Terminal Boredom – Izumi Suzuki

by

TERMINAL BOREDOM’s predictive nature is historically rooted and justified, finding form in the budding apathy of late Capitalism that was emerging when they were written.

The Works of Guillaume Dustan’s Volume 1: In My Room, I’m Going Out Tonight, Stronger Than Me – Guillaume Dustan

by

Normally there is a safe distance between the reader and the work, however transgressive it is, whereas in Dustan’s writing the language is intimate, precise, explicit, pornographic even, and yet, ultimately, an attack on what is known as “Literature”.

Kӓsebier Takes Berlin – Gabriele Tergit

by

In its satirical and often detached portrayal of fame, Kӓsebier Takes Berlin marks an intriguing departure from the intense psychological novels and moody literary montages of its era.