Books in Translation

The Book of Sleep – Haytham El Wardany

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THE BOOK OF SLEEP leaves us with the triad of sleep, revolution, and poetry, each inseparable from the other. When we separate life from its utility, we come closer to free play, to liberation as an ever-ongoing struggle.

Where the Wild Ladies Are – Matsuda Aoko

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In Matsuda’s collection of spooky feminist retellings of Japanese folktales, it isn’t the ghosts or the workplace harassment that provides the jump scares: it’s the material reminder of conformity and meaningless, textureless commodity.

When the Whales Leave – Yuri Rytkheu

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In this light, Chavasse’s translation is but one echo within a cavernous history, itself but a momentary iteration on its way to another.

Difficult Light – Tomás González

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I remember my intuitive reluctance to use the word “deadline,” when I learned the word in English, it sounded hostile when someone told me for the first time: “You need to meet this deadline.” To get killed, I wondered?

Minor Detail – Adania Shibli

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MINOR DETAIL itself is an act of subversion because it represents history told on Palestinian terms, through a Palestinian voice.

Older Brother – Daniel Mella

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OLDER BROTHER itself attests to grief’s power as a catalyst for creativity.

Abigail – Magda Szabo

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Szabo’s ABIGAIL is a moral — though not moralizing — book.

Lake Like a Mirror – Ho Sok Fong

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The business of dehumanizing people and pushing them off the part of the earth that can be shared with other humans, is mostly the pretty mundane.

Serotonin – Michel Houellebecq

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Houellebecq’s aloof intensity remains paradoxical, provocative, and singular.

The Madwoman of Serrano – Dina Salústio

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In a novel where speech and silence are linked to power, it feels important that this novel, the first English-language translation by a female author from Cape Verde, can now reach a wider audience.