Debut Books

Infinite Ground – Martin MacInnes

This is much more than a book with multiple endings (or even multiple worlds); this is an impressive exploration of porosity.

Pretend We Are Lovely – Noley Reid

You put pounds of candy in your freezer you guess to give you a false sense of abundance?, a tip from a self-help book on unfull hearts and how to handle them.

Goddess of Democracy: an Occupy Lyric – Henry Wei Leung

Through witnessing the movement as an outsider while reflecting on his complex position, Leung creates a rich, dynamic inquiry into our responsibility to one another.

Code of the West – Sahar Mustafah

Here are two representations of the country: One insisting unimaginatively as to what it takes to obliterate the nuances of social difference with blunt force, and the other just trying to get by.

Mammother – Zachary Schomburg

At some point in your life, something will fall in front of your feet that you did not expect. There’s a challenge that MAMMOTHER offers the reader: to believe, simply, in what you are about to read, and then to risk reading it.

The Resurrection of Joan Ashby – Cherise Wolas

Through Joan’s writings we see what Joan refuses to — that she has not and cannot inoculate her writing from her life; that her art and her life are symbiotic.

Goodbye, Vitamin – Rachel Khong

The way that Ruth gauges the progression of her father’s illness is food-centric.

Overpour – Jane Wong

Wong’s speakers are possessed of a transforming power, but the physical realities around them push back, or bind them in ways they can’t escape.

Swallow the Fish – Gabrielle Civil

Civil upends our assumptions around artistic displays of the body, demands we consider the fact that performance art engages with unruly ghosts and wounded riddles.

Orogeny – Irène Mathieu

OROGENY generates mountains; dynamite destroys them. The cycle is complete; the circle closes. Or perhaps not.