by Will Preston

That Time of Year – Marie Ndiaye

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NDiaye’s tale is also a vivid portrait of ennui: the seductiveness and corrosiveness of boredom, the draining experience of being trapped in a single space, isolated from the routines and relationships of your life.

Native Tongue Trilogy – Suzette Haden Elgin

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A forgotten classic of feminist dystopian fiction, the NATIVE TONGUE trilogy is a brilliant illustration of how writers might use genre to grapple with the problems of patriarchy.

Labyrinth – Burhan Sönmez

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Labyrinth is the mystery novel at its most existential, in which the person who has disappeared is the protagonist himself, in which the mystery is the greatest of them all.

Oval – Elvia Wilk

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This is OVAL’s central joke, and also its most cutting observation: in our current age of convenience culture and mass gentrification, what does it take to live an ethical life?

The Book of Collateral Damage – Sinan Antoon

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Paper is flammable, after all, and to count the dead would take a lifetime.

Dark Constellations – Pola Oloixarac

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In Oloixarac’s hands, this world is one in which the boundaries between humans, plants, and animals have already begun to dissolve.

Dead Girls – Alice Bolin

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The book should’ve been called anything other than DEAD GIRLS.