by Kara Laurene Pernicano

Sho – Douglas Kearney

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Kearney’s poetic performance is breaking the very institutions that claim to define it — and bend us all, like a horse.

In the Company of Men – Véronique Tadjo

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While it is not a “Covid novel,” the book may inspire creative work that honors the stories of essential workers across the world today, even as it contests modernization and demands attention to global injustice.

Notes Made While Falling – Jenn Ashworth

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Ashworth’s memoir project — “about my body gone missing”— demands that critics likewise confront their stake in narratives of trauma, illness, and disability.

Warhol’s Mother’s Pantry: Art, America, and the Mom in Pop – M. I. Devine

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The totality of Devine’s work is steeped in an American mythos to reclaim the synergy of pop songs, poetry, and photography for our own contemporary imagination.

A History of My Brief Body – Billy-Ray Belcourt

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From a native queer experience, Belcourt extends what it means to live in a state, to surpass the body’s defined frame, and to practice emoting as transcendence.

My Art is Killing Me and Other Poems – Amber Dawn

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My Art is Killing Me reflects what it’s like to intimately carry someone else’s exhale; Dawn’s work becomes like a release of the tension, a liturgy on the job.

Thresholes – Lara Mimosa Montes

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It’s essential to respect something about the very fabric of this book-that is, to embrace the holes.