by Josh Vigil

Skyland – Andrew Durbin

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Skyland is most preoccupied with this very relationship, the one between fiction and reality, or autobiography, and how this relationship is fraught, one streaked by slippage.

Machines In The Head – Anna Kavan

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Her stories feel prescient today; they capture the madness and degradation of isolation and living in a ravaged world.

Cleanness – Garth Greenwell

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CLEANNESS, at its core, is an examination of the sticky and inextricable pairing of masculinity and violence.

I Used to Be Charming – Eve Babitz

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Babitz has not lost her caustic, self-deprecating, and observational humor. But does it still work? Or, rather, is it what we need?

Sleeveless – Natasha Stagg

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A nod to communism doesn’t make fashion political, it makes it nothing more than collage.

Exquisite Mariposa – Fiona Alison Duncan

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Its first bites taste like mainstream contemporary fiction; they go down easy, like candy, or like a Sally Rooney novel. But as you continue to chew — because this novel is chewy — you encounter something quite different.