From the Quarterly

Another Life

She’d jotted down many questions, each marking a point on a borderline in the text where either her concentration failed or her resistance to Suah’s narrative succeeded. Passages underlined in blue, margins filled with wavery scribble; the train had been rocking back and forth.

Poetry of Negation and the Negation of Poetry: Dissidence and form in Vietnamese poetry

Dissident poetry resonates against oppression, advocates for democracy, reveals previously undisclosed information, and attacks (the dogma of) traditional values associated with state power.

No One Promised Us Anything: Poetry in Mexico City

The act of climbing a platform and reading poetry in the street is part of the literary transformation that’s arisen in Mexico City. Poets no longer seek closed spaces where only their acquaintances attend to pat them on the back as an institutionalized greeting.

Against a Beige Vision

Oakland, poetry, and radical empathy.

The End, an Introduction

The pieces you will find in this issue address not just the end, but perhaps what happens after.

Jesús Carmona-Robles

“I do not believe in the poet as a prophet. I do not believe in the poet as a revelator of absolute truths. I do not believe in the poet as a warrior. I think the poet is a sort of journalist of himself who uses language to flirt with beauty.”

Zali Gurevitch

it can be a comment about desire it can be anything in one word

Final Words

On reading and writing books in two centuries.

Consumption of Culture as Politics

In Mexico, state-sponsored films allow symbolic critique to supplant structural change.

Stefano Harney (part 2)

We might say partial education is sisterhood and brotherhood of, with, and for the general antagonism.