Thinking the Present

Against Everything – Mark Greif

It is Greif’s willingness to court his own ambivalences and inconsistencies that make these essays both enjoyable and genuinely edifying.

Folding the Red into the Black – Walter Mosley

Written before the Trump ascendency, Walter Mosley’s UNTOPIA stands as an accessible point-by-point inventory of real systemic shortcomings dressed up by American optimism.

Living a Feminist Life – Sara Ahmed

This book is very kind because it teaches you to read between the white men, even if it’s chairs.

Making Literature Now – Amy Hungerford

Hungerford complains about the power of the commercial market to make reputations, but doesn’t “interrogate,” as professors say, her own institutional power.

Rem Koolhaas and Hal Foster – Junkspace/Running Room

Junkspace appears to be a concept, but it’s not, really; it’s more a slogan, one meant to umbrella over every bit of architecture.

Things That Can and Cannot Be Said – Arundhati Roy and John Cusack

In THINGS THAT CAN AND CANNOT BE SAID, traveling to see Snowden is a little like waiting for Godot. The non-event clears the way for an empty contemplative space.

Reading From Behind – Jonathan A. Allan

Women, in READING FROM BEHIND, exist as oft-quoted scholars, but never as the sexual, multi-orificed and full-bodied humans that men are allowed to be.

Drone and Apocalypse – Joanna Demers

[DRONE & APOCALYPSE] is in part a delineation of a secular, nihilistic faith, a faith that can rely only on worldly beauty for its unifying force.

The Art of the Publisher – Roberto Calasso

The publisher is not dying, it is adapting in order to survive.

This Divided Island – Samanth Subramanian

Divided Island, then, is a post-war book, which tries to saturate its pages with the atmosphere of war.