Thinking the Present

Ethical Probe on Mixed Martial Arts Enthusiasts in the USA – Andy Martrich

More than a sport, MMA is a hyperbolic spectacle that echoes and validates its viewers’ faith in old-fashioned notions of truth and realism.

A Marxist Education – Wayne Au

The overdetermination of education as a moral endeavor is rife both within the profession and in public and political discourse.

Radical Sacrifice – Terry Eagleton

The dust jacket claims that Radical Sacrifice “distils the essence of Eagleton’s later thought,” but at the outset it seems like that later thought is stuck in an era now long past.

Millennials and the Moments that Made Us – Shaun Scott

[Shaun Scott] uses the book as an occasion to decenter and problematize the mainstream cultural idea of the American Millennial as any middle- or upper-class white twenty-something with a liberal arts degree trying to make it as, say, a voice of a generation.

M Archive: After the End of the World – Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Emitting Afrofuturism and centering black female imagination, M ARCHIVE embodies critical future writing now.

Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet: Ghosts and Monsters of the Anthropocene

These are ontological and epistemological accounts challenging the kind of Cartesian dualism and anthropocentric thinking Ghosh points to as giving rise to modernity’s deranged, novelistic view of our world.

Fictionalizing Anthropology – Stuart McLean

FICTIONALIZING ANTHROPOLOGY uses the decaying conventions of academic rhetoric to create a kind of speculative and essayistic social science nonfiction

Fictionalizing Anthropology

What if invention, undertaken as a collective project, were the most powerful rejoinder both to the constraining pretend-pragmatism of much mainstream politics and to the dogmatically asserted “alternative facts” of populist, right-wing demagoguery?

Stuart Hall’s Voice – David Scott

For several generations to come Stuart Hall’s voice will remain a key part of conversations on the left.

Against Everything – Mark Greif

It is Greif’s willingness to court his own ambivalences and inconsistencies that make these essays both enjoyable and genuinely edifying.