Reviews

Watchfires – Hilary Plum

WATCHFIRES explores how personal accounts of cancer and autoimmune disorder might illuminate the collective contemporary moment.

My Private Property – Mary Ruefle

Voice is a strange part of me. It gives language to what I experience, and experiences alongside me. Voice — in speech or in Ruefle’s case writing — also affects the very experience it tries to articulate.

Homesick for Another World – Otessa Moshfegh

We’re human, we’re fucked, how do we even love when the impulse yields nothing but disgusting spores because we’re breathing into the necks of garbage people: it’s 2017.

Folding the Red into the Black – Walter Mosley

Written before the Trump ascendency, Walter Mosley’s UNTOPIA stands as an accessible point-by-point inventory of real systemic shortcomings dressed up by American optimism.

This Blue Novel – Valerie Mejer Caso

The line “English is a language of water and good for recounting disasters” reads like meta-commentary about these translations.

Nicotine – Gregor Hens

It has been eleven months since I quit smoking cigarettes; eleven months and seven days. And I can honestly say I only think about smoking several times a day.

Living a Feminist Life – Sara Ahmed

This book is very kind because it teaches you to read between the white men, even if it’s chairs.

Visceral Poetics – Eleni Stecopoulos

In [Stecopoulos’] travels through health, “words, vocables, writing, and philological aura” exist as medical technology.

Bright Magic: Stories – Alfred Döblin

The variety of Döblin’s work may have hurt his chances at posterity, but it’s this same quality that makes BRIGHT MAGIC such a joy to read.

Disorderly Families – Arlette Farge & Michel Foucault

Farge and Foucault’s presentation of their findings in the Bastille archives provides a much-needed corrective to historians’ hitherto single-scale, unidirectional perspective.

The Babysitter at Rest – Jen George

George takes us close to the absurdism of Donald Barthelme, but also the blurred distinctions between realism and science fiction that can be found in the work of Doris Lessing.

WoO – Renee Angle

It’s not the truth behind the founding of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that’s important here. What’s important are the bodies, the violence, the people that are at stake in this truth.

This Blue Novel – Valerie Mejer Caso

The line “English is a language of water and good for recounting disasters” reads like meta-commentary about these translations.

Bright Magic: Stories – Alfred Döblin

The variety of Döblin’s work may have hurt his chances at posterity, but it’s this same quality that makes BRIGHT MAGIC such a joy to read.