Reviews

Bird – Noy Holland

Holland’s language is dizzying, decadent, erotic.

The Art of the Publisher – Roberto Calasso

The publisher is not dying, it is adapting in order to survive.

The State We’re In: Maine Stories – Ann Beattie

[Beattie’s] tenth short fiction collection urges this existential observation: that the homosexual and heterosexual acts are not equivalent; only the latter is the terrifying, potentially co-creative, real thing.

My Wet Hot Drone Summer – Lex Brown

Using the cloak of the erotic novel, which historically has been seen as light entertainment and even farce, Brown’s discussion of body politics, privacy, and surveillance feels remarkably subversive — even as it remains in-your-face, as pornographic text tends to do.

Resentment: A Comedy – Gary Indiana

Resentment often reads like a queer fin-de-siècle Chandler — Marlowe loitering in gay bathhouses, picking up well-hung hustlers, and getting high on crystal meth.

Good People – Robert Lopez

These circular stories are never organized into tidy sequences of events. Rather, they collect data around certain catastrophic experiences that remain nebulous and unknowable.

Where the Wind Can Find It – Ben Nickol

Throughout this collection, Nickol successfully limns a space between the false and the true, in which the same conclusion — suffering and loneliness — follows from both facts and deceits.

Playthings – Alex Pheby

Whilst its opaque perspective draws on modernist tropes of disruption, Pheby’s novel is also crucially a historical novel, and through its depiction of real life events it offers a perspective on the upheavals of the century subsequent to Schreber’s own.

Azimuths – R. A. Morean

The whole novel comes as the incomplete sum of angular measurements against maternal figures, breaking away scenarios, secrecy, personal chronicles, confinement and changes.

Witches of America – Alex Mar

We speak derisively of being slaves to routine, but if all obligations were eliminated, if we were confronted by complete freedom of choice, who among us could honestly say that she would not be paralyzed?

Bird – Noy Holland

Holland’s language is dizzying, decadent, erotic.

See You in the Morning – Mairead Case

This is not the mode of the stereotypical teenage diary . . . this is the mode of someone hoping that by taking in everything, everything will be revealed.

The Art of the Publisher – Roberto Calasso

The publisher is not dying, it is adapting in order to survive.

Simone – Eduardo Lalo

The book is, at its core, an argument, even a challenge: to bypass a country’s literature is to also ignore its history, its people, its love and its pain, and to care about them is to read them.