Reviews

10:04 – Ben Lerner

Why do we tell stories, and does reality change just a little when they aren’t true?

Guantanamo – Frank Smith

In a sea of linguistic uncertainty, the locus of meaning, that original word, is more often than not established solely through force.

Fourteen Stories, None of Them Are Yours – Luke B. Goebel

Short sentences are followed by half-page, single-sentence paragraphs that read like David Foster Wallace channeling Hunter S. Thompson.

Writers – Antoine Volodine

Volodine’s writers, as it turns out, write because they must kill.

The Luminol Reels – Laura Ellen Joyce

You can afford to read The Luminol Reels, which runs a slender ninety-seven pages, multiple times. Plan on doing so.

We Are the Birds of the Coming Storm – Lola Lafon

Lafon’s is a novel that asks, in certain ways, not to be reviewed.

Paper Lantern & Ecstatic Cahoots – Stuart Dybek

For all the stories about love and broken hearts that exist, Dybek does more than add his Chicagoan twist.

Wolf in White Van – John Darnielle

It is about life being hard, getting much worse, and then living with the practically unthinkable. Wolf in White Van is a tragedy.

Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky – David Connerley Nahm

As dazzling and unsettling as a lone firework suddenly bursting — then just as quickly vanishing — on an otherwise dark, quiet night.

Sweetness #9 – Stephen Eirik Clark

The intentions of a Rembrandt and the team that created Sweet Maui Potato Chips can never be that far apart, it seems.

Fourteen Stories, None of Them Are Yours – Luke B. Goebel

Short sentences are followed by half-page, single-sentence paragraphs that read like David Foster Wallace channeling Hunter S. Thompson.

Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky – David Connerley Nahm

As dazzling and unsettling as a lone firework suddenly bursting — then just as quickly vanishing — on an otherwise dark, quiet night.

Guantanamo – Frank Smith

In a sea of linguistic uncertainty, the locus of meaning, that original word, is more often than not established solely through force.

Writers – Antoine Volodine

Volodine’s writers, as it turns out, write because they must kill.