Reviews

Poso Wells – Gabriela Alemán

POSO WELLS is the sort of dizzying novel that only begins to make sense as it finishes, but then becomes so fascinating that you want to read the hazy first hundred pages all over again.

Nobody Hates Trump More Than Trump: An Intervention – David Shields

If actual [David] Shields were really serious about ending the oligarchy, he’d have written a different book.

The Houseguest and Other Stories – Amparo Dávila

Cortázar seems unwilling to recognize that what one person finds excessive another will consider just the right touch.

The Anguish of Thought — Évelyne Grossman

Anguish is, after all, the core watchword of modernism, beloved of avant-garde artists, writers, and thinkers since the salons of the mid-nineteenth century.

Riddance – Shelley Jackson

RIDDANCE, it turns out, is not simply (or even primarily) a gothic fantasy about communing with the dead but an allegory about writing.

H&G – Anna Maria Hong

When our tiny tour group was called to join our guide, instead of flashy ghostbuster jumpsuit or LED-studded skeleton or goth employee just dressed regular, we got Steve.

Modern Science and Anarchy – Peter Kropotkin

MODERN SCIENCE AND ANARCHY deserves to be read, if only to briefly inhabit the intoxication of Kropotkin’s hope.

Nevada Days – Bernardo Atxaga

NEVADA DAYS doesn’t match up to plot-driven works of fiction — despite its sub-plot of sexual assault and murder — because that’s not the kind of fiction Atxaga has written.

Toddler Hunting and Other Stories – Taeko Kono

Though Kono is absorbed with domestic life, she pushes the conventional limits of realism by exposing the ways in which the rules of domesticity are artificial, provisional, or self-imposed.

Spain – Caren Beilin

Rather than some romantic communion of artist, art, and place, this memoir is a record of all the noise that overwhelms the blank-page silence, in which we find artist, art, and place at odds.

Summer Cannibals – Melanie Hobson

SUMMER CANNIBALS, Melanie Hobson’s addition to the canon of Country Manors In Sharp Decline, proposes another reason for the downfall of polite society: the patriarchy itself.

Revenge of the Translator – Brice Matthieussent

You could also say that it was her most transgressive, subversive move to forego revenge, content instead to disappear.

Poso Wells – Gabriela Alemán

POSO WELLS is the sort of dizzying novel that only begins to make sense as it finishes, but then becomes so fascinating that you want to read the hazy first hundred pages all over again.

The Houseguest and Other Stories – Amparo Dávila

Cortázar seems unwilling to recognize that what one person finds excessive another will consider just the right touch.