Reviews

Mature Themes – Andrew Durbin

Mature Themes searches for pieces of people in the streaming media as if panning for gold.

Paper Champion – Shane Jones

A big octopus shows up and helps them, but the volcano is undeterred and continues moving forward.

By Night the Mountain Burns – Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel

It is a melodic text rife with images of hollowed canoes and mist-enveloped mountains.

Skeleton Costumes – Thomas Moore

As if Rimbaud were on Whatsapp.

Love Me Back – Merritt Tierce

The book provides you with the wincing secondhand anxiety of watching someone smart you know hurt themselves, repeatedly.

The Spectral Link – Thomas Ligotti

He is a metaphysical mutant in that he is a hodgepodge of clichéd horror motifs and effects, and metaphysical ideas. He’s a rhetorical monster.

Diary of the Fall – Michel Laub

According to these numbers, the narrator knows more about his grandfather (38+22=60) than either about his father (31+28=59) or about himself (31+26=57).

Ugly Girls – Lindsay Hunter

I don’t trust adults to write about youth as much as I did before I became an adult myself.

My Salinger Year – Joanna Rakoff

Oh, the ironies! given Holden’s low opinion of David Copperfield. To recall, he called coming of age novels written in the Copperfield mold crap.

A Distant Father – Antonio Skármeta

Brevity is not a shortcoming here and in no way keeps the narrative from being a fulfilling read.

The Maggot People – Henning Koch

Serious, grotesque absurdity: The Master and Margarita as written by William Burroughs, a politico-religious sci-fi thriller with talking dogs and immortal maggot people.

The Wallcreeper – Nell Zink

David Sedaris once quipped that speaking German is like speaking English but sideways. Reading The Wallcreeper — which happens, incidentally, to be set in mostly German-speaking places — feels like reading but sideways.

By Night the Mountain Burns – Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel

It is a melodic text rife with images of hollowed canoes and mist-enveloped mountains.

A Distant Father – Antonio Skármeta

Brevity is not a shortcoming here and in no way keeps the narrative from being a fulfilling read.