Reviews

Niceties – Elizabeth Mikesch

[Niceties] is the rare exception in which the term poetic used to describe fiction isn’t hyperbolic. The stories feel like prose poems because they operate according to associative logic and sonic pleasures.

Women Who Make A Fuss – Isabelle Stengers & Vinciane Despret

What is the value of walking soberly and honorably to the guillotine? Why not cry and scream all the way there?

Every Day Is for the Thief – Teju Cole

As much as I like reading Cole online, the experience of reading his work in a big chunk is sharper and feels more complete.

What Would Lynne Tillman Do? – Lynne Tillman

Fiction writers’ opinions on current events have a basic, ironic appeal: Credentials, qualifications — they have none.

Flametti, or the Dandyism of the Poor – Hugo Ball

It is not often I read a novel so enthusiastic and unconstrained (and so funny) in its use of language and in its building of worlds.

Travel Notes (From here — to there) – Stanley Crawford

The logic here is Kafka’s, one emphasizing powerlessness, comedy, and terror. And like Kafka’s, it’s a logic Crawford often locates in the formal structures of speech, the way language can seem to contain crucial information even when it’s actually just bunches of barks and wind.

What Ends – Andrew Ladd

What Ends pulls at past and future, as the out-of-sequence sections zoom in on certain years on the island and the events that ultimately lead towards an uncertain future for both the island and its last inhabitants.

Is It My Body? – Kim Gordon

A re-branding of Kim Gordon, and an eloquent reversal of emphasis.

Praying Drunk – Kyle Minor

The book is caught between the impulse to evoke the culture and struggles of the Bible Belt and what seems like a retroactive concern with aesthetic design.

Europe in Sepia – Dubravka Ugresic

Ugresic is not interested in declaring the present to be exceptionally hopeful or hopeless. She’s interested, rather, in talking about the particularity of now as it scrambles out of the past and lurches towards the future.

Niceties – Elizabeth Mikesch

[Niceties] is the rare exception in which the term poetic used to describe fiction isn’t hyperbolic. The stories feel like prose poems because they operate according to associative logic and sonic pleasures.

What Ends – Andrew Ladd

What Ends pulls at past and future, as the out-of-sequence sections zoom in on certain years on the island and the events that ultimately lead towards an uncertain future for both the island and its last inhabitants.

Women Who Make A Fuss – Isabelle Stengers & Vinciane Despret

What is the value of walking soberly and honorably to the guillotine? Why not cry and scream all the way there?

Flametti, or the Dandyism of the Poor – Hugo Ball

It is not often I read a novel so enthusiastic and unconstrained (and so funny) in its use of language and in its building of worlds.