Blog

Why Breaking Bad Might Be Good

I’m trusting that the show is less about one man and his family and more about the inherent interconnectedness of our world — that it is less interested in its characters’ actions themselves than in their far-reaching consequences.

Game of Tomes: Full Stop Comes to Brooklyn Magazine

It’s violent, it’s titillating, it’s (hopefully) funny — it’s . . . Game of Tomes.

I See You Face To Face: Walt Whitman and Walter White

Watching Breaking Bad in light of Walt Whitman is to meditate on the American Dream through a glass, darkly.

Reflections from a Polar Bear Occupier

Yesterday morning, Occupy was just what I needed: a space to celebrate my freedom to express the political and social frustrations I inadvertently build up everyday.

A Slob’s Apology

Stuff — events — dates — pile up in our individual histories, but to try organizing them in temporal order, to turn time into space via filing, is to fall back on a convenient fiction.

A Gifted High School Senior Endorses Paul Ryan for Vice President

Not just anyone can be a leader, a job creator, and a master of the world; only the chosen, talented few like me and Ryan, and my dad, who is an orthodontist.

It’s Not About the Kids

The Democratic party is not the party of teachers, and it is not the party of students. It is the party of privatization, of Wall Street, of the supposed “choice” afforded us by the free market. But it doesn’t have to be.

The Neverending Story

I get the uncanny valley wiggins. Unreal becomes real, and all of a sudden, the emotions of The Real Housewives become valid, human feelings (albeit ones expressed by dangerous narcissists).

New Poetry from New Zealand: Ross Brighton

Brighton’s poetry is mostly a collage of randomized words and sounds taken everywhere from Samuel Beckett to Wikipedia, and New Zealand is having a hard time taking him seriously.

A Blog Post About Death

David Rakoff and Christopher Hitchens . . . straddled the problem of narrative, shaping the story of their own death and through that process making their way towards acceptance of the incomprehensibility of actually dying. Even when accepted, actually dying does not become comprehensible.